Deb Headworth

Archive for the ‘blood sugar’ Category

Addicted to sugar?

In addiction, blood sugar, calcium, cravings, herb lax, soy, sugar on December 14, 2008 at 11:17 am
  • Sugar Can Be Addictive: Animal Studies Show Sugar Dependence 
  • (December 11, 2008) — Scientists have demonstrated that sugar can be an addictive substance, wielding its power over the brains of lab animals in a manner similar to many drugs of abuse. Researchers found profound behavioral changes in rats that, through experimental conditions, have been trained to become dependent on high doses of sugar. Lab animals that were denied sugar for a prolonged period after learning to binge worked harder to get it when it was reintroduced to them. They consumed more sugar than they ever had before, suggesting craving and relapse behavior. … > full story

    Tips: 

  1.  
    1. Keep blood sugar balanced using a protein source with all 9 essential amino acids.  
    2. Stop sugar cravings with a balanced  B Vitamin.
    3. Stop chocolate cravings with calcium, magnesium & D.
    4. Remove toxins from the body with herbs.  Why?  Toxins cause the pancreas to misfire, causing blood sugar abnormalities and cravings.
    5. Replace refined sugar and artificial sweetners with… safe sweetners.

Green Tea: tooth decay, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, MS, cholesterol, weight, digestion, detox chemicals and alcohol

In alcohol, alzheimer's, antioxidant, beriberi disease, blood sugar, blotchiness, body temperature, bonde health, bone health, brain, cancer, detox, digestion, fatigue, green tea, HDL, heart, LDL, metabolism, morepinephrine, multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative disease, parkinson's, soda, stimulant, tea, thirst, tooth decay, urinary funciton, weight on December 14, 2008 at 10:49 am
  • Drink Tea To Avoid Tooth Erosion, Study Suggests (November 28, 2008) — Researchers compared green and black tea to soda and orange juice in terms of their short- and long-term erosive effect on human teeth. The study found that the erosive effect of tea was similar to that of water, which has no erosive effect. … full story
  • History  Wikipedia 
    • Tea consumption had its origin in China more than 4,000 years ago[5]. Green tea has been used as traditional medicine in areas such as China, Japan, India and Thailand to help everything from controlling bleeding and helping heal wounds to regulating body temperature, blood sugar and promoting digestion.
    • The Kissa Yojoki (Book of Tea), written by Zen priest Eisai in 1191, describes how drinking green tea can have a positive effect on the five vital organs, especially the heart. The book discusses tea’s medicinal qualities, which include easing the effects of alcohol, acting as a stimulant, curing blotchiness, quenching thirst, eliminating indigestion, curing beriberi disease, preventing fatigue, and improving urinary and brain function.
  • Claims  Wikipedia
    • Stopping certain neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.
    • The prevention and treatment of cancer [6]
    • Treating multiple sclerosis [7]
    • Preventing the degradation of cell membranes by neutralizing the spread of free radicals which occur during oxidation process. [8][dubious ]
    • Reducing the negative effects of LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) by lowering levels of triglycerides and increasing the production of HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol).
    • Joy Bauer, a New York City nutritionist, says [the catechins in green tea] increase levels of the metabolism speeding brain chemical norepinephrine (noradrenaline).
    • Japanese researchers claim that drinking five cups of green tea a day can burn 70 to 80 extra calories. Dr. Nicholas Perricone, a self-proclaimed anti-aging specialist, appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show and told Oprah’s viewers they can lose 10 lbs (4.5 kg) in 6 weeks drinking green tea instead of coffee.

alfalfa – cholesterol, allergies, blood sugar, arthritis

In allergy, arthritis, blood sugar, bursitis, cholesterol, digestion, heart disease, hot flash, IBS, liver, sinus, steroids on November 30, 2008 at 4:37 am

Alfalfa, the king of plants

  • reduces cholesterol
  • reduces blood sugar levels 
  • enzymes break down food
  • thins mucas (sinus, intestinal)
  • alleviates allergies / congestion
  • promotes liver health
  • detoxifies the body
  • relieve pain and stiffness of arthritis/bursitis
  • anti-cancer activity because of isoflavone/phytoestrogens content
  • alleviate postmenopausal “hot flashes”. 1
  • If cut before it blooms, alfalfa is low in fiber and high in energy. 
  • improves soil structure and condition, and controls weeds in subsequent crop rotations.
  • Alfalfa is a good source of protein, B-complex vitamins, and certain minerals, including calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorous, and potassium.
  • Alfalfa could help prevent fatigue associated with vitamin/mineral deficiency or protein energy malnutrition in disadvantaged parts of the world. 
  • absorbs significant quantities of cholesterol. The direct interaction of saponins and cholesterol is thought to be responsible for the ability of alfalfa and other saponin-containing plant materials to reverse diet induced cholesterolemia in rats. Alfalfa saponins also interact with cholesterol found in intestinal cell membranes. This potentially alters cholesterol metabolism by interfering with intestinal absorption of cholesterol. 3
  • absorbs bile acids in the small intestine which then enter the large intestine and are eliminated along with steroids.  Since steroids normally facilitate cholesterol absorption, their elimination provides another possible mechanism to reverse or prevent cholesterolemia. 4
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References

  1. Alfalfa, Supplementwatch.com, 2002 
  2. International Forage Factsheet Series, http://www.forages.css.orst.edu/Topics/Species/Legumes/Alfalfa/International_Fact_Sheet.html
  3. Hwang J, Sevanian A, Hodis H, Ursini F. Synergistic Inhibition of LDL Oxidation by Phytoestrogens and Ascorbic Acid. Free Radical Biol Med, 29(1); 2000:79-89; Malinow M, McLaughlin P, Stafford C, Livingston A, Kohler G. Alfalfa saponins and alfalfa seeds. Atherosclerosis, 37;1980:433-438; Molgaard J, von Schenck H, Olsson A. Alfalfa seeds lower low density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B concentrations in patients with type II hyperlipoproteinemia. Atherosclerosis, 65,1987:173-79.
  4. Story J, LePage S, Petro M, West L, Cassidy M, Lightfoot F, Vahouny G. Interactions of alfalfa plant and sprout

 

alfalfa