Deb Headworth

Posts Tagged ‘water bottles’

BPA in blood from plastic bottle # 7

In BPA from plastic bottles, chemical exposure, chemicals, chemicals in canned food, chemicals in plastic bottles, chemicals in your bloodstream on May 24, 2009 at 4:44 am

 

Water bottles – heart disease and diabetes?

In allergy, athletes, babies, chemicals, diabetes, heart disease on November 15, 2008 at 4:55 pm

 

JAMA Raises Concerns about BPA

–Dr. Jamie McManus, M.D., FAAFP
Chairman, Medical Affairs, Health Sciences & Education

BPA – what is it?  It is a chemical modifier used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Polycarbonate plastics typically are clear and hard and have many applications, including use in certain food and beverage packaging such as water and infant bottles, as well as compact discs, impact-resistant safety equipment, and medical devices.  About 7 billion pounds of BPA are produced worldwide each year.

Problems BPA causes?  cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease, heart attack, angina), diabetes, liver enzyme abnormalities, brain damage, developmental abnormalities, precancerous changes, metabolic syndrome, etc. 

Why BPA causes these problems?  Possibly, BPA is a hormone disruptor or modulator and causes pancreatic cells to increase insulin production.

Who is at risk?  In 2007, the CDC found BPA in the urine of nearly 93% tested.  This indicates widespread exposure to BPA in the US.  Who has the highest levels?   Children, then females, then males.

Shaklee’s response:  Shaklee’s first commitment is to product safety and, as such, our product packaging is free of BPA.

Tips to reduce Exposure to BPA:

  1. Avoid Reusable Polycarbonate (labeled #7) plastic water and baby bottles, which tend to be hard, clear and colorful. Choose polyethylene or glass.  
  2. Avoid Polycarbonate Plastic Food Containers and Tableware. These may also be labeled “PC” underneath a plastic code #7 in the recycling triangle on the bottom of the container. Use instead: BPA-free plastics with the recycling labels #1, #2, or #4 and #5, ceramic or glass. Soft or cloudy-colored plastic containers do not usually contain BPA.
  3. Minimize the use of canned food & drink, especially tomato sauces because the high acidity causes more chemical leaching. Choose foods which are fresh, frozen, or stored in glass. The recent study by EWG found BPA in more than half of the 97 canned goods that were tested.
  4. Ask your dentist for BPA-free sealants and composite fillings.
  5. Avoid microwaving or heating any food in plastic containers because heat may release chemicals into food.

Body Burden Test – How many chemicals are found in your bloodstream? 

 

References: (full list in full article)